Landscapes of New Jersey at Morris County Library

It is a genuine honor to have my exhibit in such a prestigious building so well set up for art. “Landscapes of New Jersey” on display now through the end of June.

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Featured Artist for the Month of June 2017 at Morris County Library

My newest finished piece, “Day’s End at Great Bay”, has just been matted and framed to 24″x36″ and is displayed nearest the front desk.

Dave Blinder's newest fine art landscape piece

Day’s End at Great Bay Boulevard

Morris County Library
30 East Hanover Ave
Whippany, NJ
(973) 285-6930

If you’ve gotten to see my exhibit I appreciate all constructive criticism – daveblinderphotography@gmail.com

 

New Jersey Fine Art Photography

Landscapes of New Jersey photo exhibit, looking right down hallway

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Dave Blinder’s artist bio on display

Dave Blinder Photography Exhibit

Landscapes of New Jersey, looking left down hallway

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Art Photo: Traffic

I guess you could call this one street photography?  The technique was admittedly little more than a random snapshot, but whenever I look at this I like it more.  I’d like to shoot a series of similar snapshots.

PA Art Photo

A lucky or unlucky snapshot of cars and their headlights in #NewHope Pennsylvania. Photo taken handheld with the #Tamron 16-300mm VC All-In-One lens and the Canon EOS M mirrorless camera.

Photo taken handheld with the Tamron 16-300mm VC lens and the Canon EOS M mirrorless camera.  Exposure settings:  0.8s F/5 ISO 200

New Jersey Nature Photography: Ice on the Beaver Brook

The visual element of ice and the textures within in it can easily consume a photographer’s attention for long periods of time.  For the below frame, it was only natural for me to center the reflection of the plant and also place it off-center.  This gives our eyes a chance to look around and discover the various textures and tones within the ice.

NJ Art photo

On a cold November day in #NewJersey, frail vegetation sits isolated on the blue ice of the Beaver Brook. #Photo taken with the #Tamron 16-300mm VC All-In-One lens and the Canon EOS M mirrorless camera.

Photo taken with the Tamron 16-300mm VC All-In-One lens and the Canon EOS M mirrorless camera.

New Jersey Nature Photography: Meadow, Trees, and Hills

Using a telephoto lens to compress the shapes of distant hills into “waves” is a time-tested technique that can produce great aesthetics.  For this photo (taken yesterday), I aligned some small trees for a foreground element to present the distant hills.  The key to getting the foreground just right was to not overpower the scene, but also to take up a bit of the negative space.

NJ Art Photo

Layers of rolling hills weave through the frame as distant tones of blue and a peaceful meadow draws the viewer in. Photo taken with the Tamron 16-300mm VC All-In-One lens and the Canon EOS M.

Above photo taken with the Tamron 16-300mm VC All-In-One lens and the tripod-mounted Canon EOS M mirrorless camera.  Exposure settings: 1/125 F/11 ISO 100, 251mm

New Jersey Nature Photography: Leaves over Lake

We still have some remnants of Fall foliage here in New Jersey, making for many photo opportunities.  Today I noticed some vivid yellows, with interesting shapes to the branches overlooking a scenic lake.  The moody sky and contrasty yellow leaves opened the doors to creative art photography.

New Jersey Art Photo

Golden yellow leaves unfurl against a backdrop of storm clouds threatening over a lake. Photo taken with the Tamron 16-300mm VC All-In-One lens.

Autumn at Ken Lockwood Gorge; #1

What is one to do on a rainy, cool, and overcast day on New Jersey?  Take nature photographs of course 🙂

This was only my second visit to the Ken Lockwood Gorge Wildlife Management Area.  I wasn’t certain if it was a great place for landscape photos. With the element of running water in a nature area and also clouded skies, I figured it was worth a try… It was worth it.

New Jersey Landscape Photography

Brilliant yellow leaves line the banks of the South Branch of the Raritan River in New Jersey.

This was one of the broadest densities of yellow leaves that I laid my eyes on, and it also made a great vantage point for the s-curve of the river.

Photographed with the Tamron 14-150mm Di III lens, a circular polarizing filter, and the Olympus PEN E-PL3 micro four thirds camera.  Exposure settings were: 0.8s F/11 ISO 200

Fog on Lakeshore

This landscape photograph was taken at 7:16 AM at Ricketts Glen State Park in Pennsylvania.  The composition is framed using several points of alignment to the rule of thirds.  An obscured background tree caused by the dense layer of fog adds the essential element of mystery to the photo.

Fine Art Nature Photography

A few minutes after sunrise, a blanket of fog sets the mood on Lake Jean at Ricketts Glen State Park in Pennsylvania. Photographed with the Tamron 14-150mm Di II and the Olympus PEN E-PL3 compact camera.

Equipment used: Tamron 14-150mm Di III Lens, circular polarizing filter, Olympus PEN E-PL3 micro four thirds camera, and Benro carbon fiber tripod.  Aperture Priority exposure mode resulted in camera settings of: 0.6s F/10 ISO 200.  17mm focal length, RAW image format, 2 second timer.

Nature Photography in 20 Frames; my free how-to ebook on DSLR photography

Nature Photography in 20 Frames

Cover for my free short but detailed PDF ebook on Wildlife, Macro, and Landscape Photography. Get your $5 PayPal donation ready… but only if you feel like paying for it 🙂

Press release for upcoming eBook:

Nature Photography in 20 Frames
By Dave Blinder

I’ve completed the content for my first eBook which will be offered in its entirety as a free download, no strings attached, no trojan viruses, etc.  My short illustrated PDF is currently undergoing quality checks and proofreading.  I will provide download locations as soon as possible.  If anyone finds value in the book, I would greatly appreciate a $5 PayPal donation (info included in book) as I have done this work at my own expense.

Within the book I have provided full DSLR settings for each photo shown as well as a grid overlay to demonstrate the composition.  A focus point is also superimposed on each shot to show where critical focus was set.  The nature photos in my book encompass my personal approach to shooting Macro subjects, Landscapes, Birds, and Other Wildlife.

My PDF eBook will be completely free for non-commercial usage and distribution, but may not be altered in any way.  I will offer the eBook via email, my personal website, and try to have it uploaded to popular file sharing services as well.  I will be available to conduct private and public seminars to expand on the subject matter to support my material.

If you’d like personal notification upon release of my eBook send me an email – daveblinder@yahoo.com

Thanks very much,
Dave Blinder
Denville, New Jersey
http://twitter.com/daveblinder
https://daveblinder.wordpress.com
http://flickr.com/davidraymond

Expressing motion in photography: Laughing Gull in flight

Plenty of terms for the type of DSLR photography illustrated in the main image below and to tell you the truth I don’t even know what to call them.  Panning blurs may be the most logical terminology in my opinion.  Anyways, I often forget how much I enjoy looking at this type of capture.  It seems to boil the bird down to its very essence: shapes and colors.

Larus delawarensis

Photo demonstrating intentional use of a slow shutter speed along with panning of a telephoto lens.

Picture taken using a Canon EOS 7D and the Tamron SP 150-600mm VC telephoto lens.  Tripod lens collar is mounted to Manfrotto 055xProB tripod and Manfrotto junior fluid head.  Camera settings: focal length at 600mm, Manually set shutter at 1/30th, aperture at F/14, ISO 100, Camera RAW, Auto White Balance, VC On, Servo Focus Mode, High Speed Motor Drive.  Photography location: Ocean County, New Jersey.  Atlantic Ocean that is…

This type of photo can sometimes be performed in Aperture Priority mode by using a low ISO and large Aperture number to slow down the shutter.  The shutter speeds that usually work best for me are between 1/13th and 1/50th.  Your mileage may vary.  My goal when preparing for this kind of shot is to get a good amount of definition on the wildlife while emphasizing some motion (in this case the wing beats).  I also want a nice bright exposure that will retain a lot of details in the highlights but still have my histogram as far to the right as possible for maximum detail.  Compositionally speaking, I may be looking to place the bird prominently in the frame without cutting off any appendages or I may want try to include some scenery like showing the bird flying across the water’s surface.  There is a great deal of trial and error in this style of photography.  Patience, persistence, and studying other photog’s successful photos will go a long. way.

Expressing motion in photography: Beach Grass and Crescent Moon

When I first began doing photography, I thought that the prime objective was to freeze all action to record a moment in time.  Getting a sharp capture of a fleeting moment can indeed be difficult, whether it is a closeup view of the supermoon rising on the horizon, a sports photograph like a MLB baseball player nailing a fastball, or a bird photo like trying to shoot a tiny Tree Swallow mid-air.  There is also great validity to having motion within your frame.  In some cases, this can evoke moods like quickly fleeting action or on the other hand, serenity.

NJ Shore Night Photo

DSLR Nature Photograph from New Jersey showcasing how motion caused by wind can express time and add further dynamics to an image.

The above image was taken recently at the New Jersey Shore using a tripod-mounted Canon EOS 60D camera and the Tamron SP 90mm VC 1:1 F/2.8 Macro Lens.  Camera settings in manual exposure: 2.5 seconds F/7.1 ISO 100.  VC off (lens stabilization motor), Mirror Lock-up, 2 Second Timer, One Shot Autofocus (near the middle of the grass), and Auto White Balance.

I think the crescent moon has a really great distinctive shape, a shape I generally associate with a peaceful sky.  The grass that I have included within the frame is typical vegetation of the mid-Atlantic shoreline, so this gives a nice sense of orientation for the viewer.  For others, the grass may be reminiscent of a prairie or meadow.  The back and forth motion of the blades of grass tell us that time is passing, and also gives the photo a much softer edged appearance than a motionless capture.  I did shoot several similar frames, but in the other images I actually felt there was too much motion and not enough definition on the grass.