5th Annual New Jersey Highlands Juried Art Exhibit

I have the great privilege of being among the finalists for the 5th Annual New Jersey Highlands Juried Art and Photography Exhibit at the Morris Museum

Museum Entrance

New Jersey Highlands Coalition Juried Art & Photography Exhibit Morris Museum Morristown, New Jersey January 11, 2018 Photo by Dave Blinder

My finalist entry within the exhibit is titled “Summer at Kincaid Woods”.  Taken in Summer 2017, I was hiking back towards my car when I found myself bathed in warm late day light as I passed over wetlands and through woodlands.

I hoped to best capture the mood of that moment.  My limited edition (1 of 25) piece is matted and framed to 16″x24″ on archival quality paper and materials.

Dave Blinder picture

Kincaid Woods in Summer by Dave Blinder New Jersey Highlands Coalition Juried Art & Photography Exhibit Morris Museum Morristown, New Jersey January 11, 2018 Photo by Dave Landry

Opening reception took place the night of January 11th 2018.  The artwork remains on display at the museum in Morristown until February 18th.  Please let me know if you visited and would like to provide feedback on your experience.

Museum Attendees

Crowd View New Jersey Highlands Coalition Juried Art & Photography Exhibit Morris Museum Morristown, New Jersey January 11, 2018 Photo by Dave Blinder

I would especially like to thank my friends Jim, Geoff, Len, Pauline, Ellen, and Douglas for coming out in support. Great mingling with the other artists and outstanding organizing by Morris Museum Staff and the Highlands Coalition.

NJ Highlands Coalition Directors

Elliott Ruga and Julia Somers New Jersey Highlands Coalition Juried Art & Photography Exhibit Morris Museum Morristown, New Jersey January 11, 2018 Photo by Dave Blinder

Dave Landry picture

David Landry Photographer, Denville Resident, POWWW Boardmember New Jersey Highlands Coalition Juried Art & Photography Exhibit Morris Museum Morristown, New Jersey January 11, 2018 Photo by Dave Blinder

NJ Highlands Painting

New Jersey Highlands Coalition Juried Art & Photography Exhibit Morris Museum Morristown, New Jersey January 11, 2018 Photo by Dave Blinder

Morris Museum Visitors

Crowd View New Jersey Highlands Coalition Juried Art & Photography Exhibit Morris Museum Morristown, New Jersey January 11, 2018 Photo by Dave Blinder

Morris Museum Exhibit

New Jersey Highlands Coalition Juried Art & Photography ExhibitMorris Museum Morristown, New JerseyJanuary 11, 2018 Photo by Dave Blinder

Morris Museum in Morristown NJ

New Jersey Highlands Coalition Juried Art & Photography Exhibit Morris Museum Morristown, New Jersey January 11, 2018 Photo by Dave Blinder

 

Morris Museum visitors information:

Morris Museum
6 Normandy Heights Road
Morristown, NJ 07960
PHONE: (973) 971-3700
EMAIL: info@morrismuseum.org

Museum Hours:
Tuesday through Saturday, 11:00am to 5:00pm
Sunday, 12:00pm to 5:00pm
The Museum is Pay as You Wish on the second and third Thursday of each month from 4:00pm to 8:00pm.

 

If you have any questions or feedback on my article or artwork please contact me at dave@daveblinder.com

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Tamron 18-400mm Full Resolution Butterfly

I took this digital photograph of an Painted Lady butterfly recently in Chester New Jersey.  Click on the picture to download or view the high resolution original.  Zoom in to view the sharpness from the new Tamron 18-400mm ultra-telephoto all-in-one lens.

Tamron 18-400mm Sharpness

Tamron 18-400mm Macro Sample Image of an Painted Lady Butterfly. Straight Out Of Camera.

The Tamron 18-400mm F/3.5-6.3 DI-II VC HLD all-in-one lens was handheld in conjunction with the Canon SL2 Digital Rebel.  I am extremely impressed by the fine detail resolved in this SOOC (straight out of camera) shot.  The tiny hairs by the butterfly eyes are very well defined.  I also like the pleasing bokeh of background flowers.

100% crop from above SOOC photograph

Tamron 18-400mm macro photography

Tamron 18-400mm VC 100% Crop SOOC. Handheld at 400mm F/9 on Canon SL2. Photo by Dave Blinder

Exposure settings:

Tamron 18-400mm VC @ 400mm, Autofocus On, Vibration Compensation On

Canon SL2 in Aperture Priority Mode +2/3 exposure, AI Servo Focus

1/800 F9 ISO 800

 

Purchase the new Tamron 18-400mm from Amazon using my affiliate links  (help support my blog)

Tamron 18-400mm for Canon – http://amzn.to/2xvjzbX

Tamron 18-400mm for Nikon – http://amzn.to/2xPqXj9

Canon EOS Rebel SL2 Digital SLR Camera Body Only – http://amzn.to/2xBsFU8

 

Do you have any questions about the lens, camera, or photograph?  Any more sample images you’d like to see?  Let me know.

Tamron 18-400mm high resolution pictures

Full resolution sample images from Tamron USA‘s​ 18-400mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD Model B028 ultra-telephoto all-in-one zoom lens

These are SOOC ( straight out of the camera ) JPEGs with no editing performed. Both shots are with the lens at full zoom, 400mm, at maximum aperture F/6.3 and taken on a 24mp SL2.

Tamron 18-400mm lens sample picture

Full Resolution SOOC sample image from the Tamron 18-400mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD Model B028 ultra-telephoto all-in-one zoom lens. Taken on a 24 megapixel Canon SL2 by Dave Blinder. Order via my Amazon affiliate link – http://amzn.to/2eMYfUO Nikon Mount

Flower photograph camera settings:

Tamron 18-400mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD Model B028

Canon EOS Rebel SL2 DSLR camera

Handheld with VC On (Vibration Control) at 400mm

1/640 F/6.3 ISO 400 using the Center Point One-Shot Autofocus and Auto White Balance

Tamron 18-400mm lens sample picture

Full Resolution SOOC sample image from the Tamron 18-400mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD Model B028 ultra-telephoto all-in-one zoom lens. Taken on a 24 megapixel Canon SL2 by Dave Blinder. Order via my Amazon affiliate link – http://amzn.to/2eMYfUO Nikon Mount

Bee photograph camera settings:

Tamron 18-400mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD Model B028

Canon EOS Rebel SL2 DSLR camera

Tripod-mounted VC Off (Vibration Control) at 400mm

1/60 F/6.3 ISO 800 using Manual Focus and Auto White Balance

 

Due to possible compression you may want to download the full pictures from my personal Google Drive – https://drive.google.com/open?id=0BwfEzS2JEk2EbTVRR01oTEwxaTQ

To order these lenses now try my Amazon Affiliate links (gives me a small commission):

http://amzn.to/2xle2W3
Canon Mount

http://amzn.to/2eMYfUO
Nikon Mount

Photographing wildlife in harsh lighting: an Eastern Fence Lizard

Below we have a photo of a small, harmless, and downright cute Eastern Fence Lizard.  A native reptile of New Jersey that is widespread within its habitat, but generally not familiar to residents of Northern New Jersey.

Sceloporus undulatus

A closeup photograph of a wild New Jersey reptile taken with a Tamron macro lens and a Canon DSLR.

Photo taken with the Tamron SP 90mm VC F/2.8 Macro Lens and the Canon EOS 7D.  Camera settings: Shutter at 1/100 Aperture at F/3.2 and an ISO speed of 200.  One Shot focus mode, camera handheld, VC On, RAW image format, manual exposure mode, auto white balance.

F/3.2 is not the punchiest aperture of my lens, but it does yield acceptable sharpness.  Shallow depth of field was very important to me in the making of this photo.  My “go to aperture” for macro of F/5.6 brought a lot more detail in the foreground AND the background.  The impact of this photo is in its simplicity and having prominent background shapes and textures strongly detracts from this type of “mid-day silhouette capture”.

Clearly with the sun high in the sky and without cloud cover, the natural illumination of the subject is going to be uneven with a large contrast between the shadows and the highlights.  Many established photographers would call this “bad light” or “problematic light”.  This is not necessarily the easiest condition to create impactful photos in but by manually exposing for the subject’s mid-tones and shooting into an uncluttered background I’ve created a minimalistic photo that evokes thoughts of desert climates.

Uncommon wildlife encounters

I have no problem photographing the ordinary and trying my hardest to make it look flattering, but every once in a while you stumble upon an animal or scenic opportunity that you feel very lucky to have encountered.  That’s how I felt when I discovered a group of young American Alligators calling for their not too distant mother.  I assumed I would have plenty of opportunities to photograph adult Gators on my Florida trip, but didn’t dream of a golden chance like this.

Baby Gator in Wetlands

Young American Alligator

Nature Photography in “bad light”

I think there really is no such thing as “bad light” in nature photography, as long as you are able to think outside of the box.  This recent photograph of an Airplant in Florida was taken while the sun was fairly high, and also a bit behind the subject.  Typically, this is an undesirable ambient light angle as the illumination of a subject is very uneven and will cause high variations in dynamic range, which in turn will probably blow out some of the highlights and block up the shadows.

Florida Airplant

Manatee River Airplant at Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary

I find this lighting angle difficult to utilize, and implausible in some scenarios.  However, it can yield some nice dramatic photos with a little experimentation.  In this instance, the sunlight has “kissed” or highlighted mainly only my target subject but caused most of the frame to fall into shadow.  Perfect for an isolating effect.